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. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: please welcome laura dern by on this program. the oscar nominees is enjoying great success on her series called "enlightened." here is a scene from "enlightened." >> where have you been for two days a? >> i was in lna. >> and? >> i do not want to talk to you about this kind of stuff. it would be great if you were happy for me, but it never works out that way. >> happy for what now? >> things are going to change for the better, so when the time is right. >> you have a new boyfriend or what? >> it is more than that. the bigger liar if i dream about. the happy, mom. that is all i need from you. tavis: all right, then. how cool is that? >> it was cool getting to work with my mom. tavis: it really is mom. since you were last year a few things have happened. you actually won a golden globe for the series. >> which is so amazing. i will say the foreign press and the critics and you, there were so many champions of the show, which was huge for us to find our following and get to the second season. it is a half-hour co
. . walmart committed $2 billion to tighunfing h as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> bernie sanders is the longest serving independence in congress in his third term after 16 years in the house. he is also the new chair of the veterans affairs committee. it is always good to have you on this program. thanks for your time. >> great to be with you. >> let me start with where we are now. we are caught between the president's inauguration day speech and his state of the union address. i want to cover both in just a second and so much more, but let me start with the inauguration speech. this is the first time we have gotten a chance to talk in person. we did not get a chance to talk that day, so let me start by asking your thoughts about the inauguration speech. the media story on the speech was that it was a very liberal, very progressive view the president expressed from what he wanted to get done in the next four years as the longest serving independent, how did you hear the speech. but the phraseology, we have to ask ourselves exact
can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: so llody price was there from the very beginning of rock- and-roll. his song "lawdy miss clawdy" crashed through barriers, going to mainstream radio. he included in hits like it's a personality" and -- like "personality" and "stagger lee," and he was inducted into the hall of fame. maybe this will jog your memory. ♪ rightreat me what you are doing to made i am going to tell everybody ♪ >> now, wikipedia says you turn 80 in march, and i am looking at you, and that cannot be possible. >> do you know what? it is. tavis: [laughs] the sunday chitlins. you could not be turning 80 in march. >> well, it is true, tavis. and it don't seem like it. it don't feel like it. i have done what i have done all of my life. i love sports, and i am a bowler. tavis: ok, go ahead and brag about your bowling. >> i have got six perfect games. tavis: all right. [laughter] >> it is very difficult. 73 million people bowl every year. on the 2.5% of the people have ever shot a perfect game. tavis: and
.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: ben harper has teamed up with master charlie musselwhite, for a new cd, titled "get up!," for the legendary stax label. it has been called cinematic in the storytelling, and it has his own brand of soaring harmonica, and to start, year is a collaboration of what this sounds like. ♪ believe a word you say i do not believe i don't believe a word you say i don't believe ♪ >> bringing something out that you would not otherwise have. tavis: ben, we are in our tent season on pbs. >> congratulations. tavis: and you have been on this program many times, and more than any other guest i have had on, you have been on because of collaborations that you went after, that you wanted to do, and they are the legends, the icons, the old-school guys who you have an appreciation for. why get into this? what is it about these old school caps that you are so drawn to? >> the heart and soul and the depth of musical inspiration that they have brought into my life, all of my li
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: martha raddatz is an emmy award winning journalist that serves as the chief global affairs correspondent for abc news that has just launched a new project with yahoo called on the radar. she is a frequent guest and part-time post. she also moderated the vice- presidential debate between joe biden and paul ryan. let me just apologize, just before we can live on the air, the satellite feed took a hit with all the news of the day and the news that will be made tomorrow. martha, thank you for doing this under these difficult situations. you'll be happy to know there is a beautiful picture of you on the screen. >> i don't know how any of that works but i know we will make it work somehow. tavis: come the about this project. >> on the radar is our digital project with yahoo and abc news. it is part of our power players and i think the power players get the 100 million hits a year. it is a real opportunity for me to sit down like you get to do and do holland your interviews. tavis: given the number of years you have been a
can stamp hunger out. >> contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: mark pinksy is the president and ceo of a nonprofit designed to align money and capital with political, economic, and social justice, opportunity finance network. ofm, and i am sure we will get to that. good to have you on the program. >> good to be here. tavis: i am not the only one continuing to do as much as we can on the issue of poverty, and this includes so much. what often does not get talked about is the fight back. i do not want to be guilty of only talking about the ugly and the bad but not talk about the significant work done by those who are trying to dig their way out over this hole that so many of all colors find themselves in. your company hopes to try to alleviate this pain and suffering. let me talk to you about what ofm does and get some specifics about the fight back on poverty. >> i appreciate your pain attention to this issue because it is one that often gets lost. opportunity finance network has what is called the community finance development institutions, or c
.ealyal dig >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs wneshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it looked like a scene from a movie, but it was all too real. a meteor came crashing down to earth today, triggered a fireball over russia, and sent people running for cover. parts of the meteor fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> reporter: eme
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: taj mahal's eclectic career braces blues, jazz, americana. nine grammy nominations. he has been on a musical odyssey. that journey can be heard now in a new boxed set includes 15 cds, 170 tracks. here is a small taste of this remarkable compilation. >> ♪ if i ever get out of this prison, i am going to do just like i please ♪ ♪ i am going to take off running to the nearest stretch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to keep running, running, running through the years bunch of trees -- the nearest bunch of trees ♪ ♪ i am going to be running through these trees ♪ ♪daddy going to be running so fast it looks like daddy been running on his knees ♪ tavis: you just mentioned daddy, and i think that is a great way to start. tell me about your daddy's record collection. >> he is an interesting guy. my grandparents came here about 100 years ago and started having children in new york city. my dad was born in 1915, and everybody is going to notice you h
work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> please welcome aaron neville. he has just released a terrific new cd. it serves as the basis for a pbs concert special. here is a sneak preview of malik true story." i got a girl and ruby is her name ♪ ♪ she don't love me but i love her just the same ♪ ♪ i am going to haunt you ♪will you be mine tavis: i saw the cd. i felt like you have been keeping something from us if this is a true story. what have we been getting all s?e other years chairma >> the first time i wanted to record our wanted to do doo- wop. i even did a doo-wop version of the mickey mouse march. >> why doo-wop? >> doo-wop nurtured me and threw me into who i am. the teacher thought i had a d d. tavis: what is it about the style that resonated in which you? >> i was not king cole, and who sam cooke. doo-wop was something that sued in may. it made everything all right. tavis: you mentioned an icon. since you mentioned him, i read somewhere where allen tried to get you to change the way you si
hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: tony goldwyn is an actor who stars on "scandal." is now in its second season and airs thursday night's. >> here is what is great about having someone attempt to assassinate you. doctors are yelling, and you could die, and you suddenly stop being afraid. then when you do not die, you realize you have nothing to lose and no time to waste. this is going to happen. i am going to divorce and remain president of the united states. that is my job. do your job. work out the details. make it happen during your -- make it happen. >> you are out of your mind. a sitting president cannot divorce his wife. >> i think you are probably right about that. he has got a few problems on his plate. >> when you saw this, what is it the most intriguing view about wanting to play a. there have been several people who have played president of the united states, but this moment with the vigor and use of the obama administration, there is so much focus placed on t
and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live in washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. the u.s. economy is a puzzling thing. today it added 157,000 jobs but the unemployment rate kicked up to 7.9%. also today the dow industrial average closed above 14,000 for the first time in five years, yet the government reported this week that the economy contracted in the fourth quarter of last year for the first time since 2009. so as congress agrees to delay a showdown over the debt ceiling and faces a march 1 deadline for across the board spending cuts, what to make of this darned economy, david? >> am i supposed to answer that? it is confusing. the stock market is up. employers are hiring, very slowly. the government now tells us that hey -- they hired a lot more last year than previously believed. auto seafls are up 14% from last year. housing sales are coming back. on the other hand the economy took a pause at the end of last year? unemployment is very high, 7.9%. among men between 25 and 54 one out of six is not working. so i think when you cu
the following is part of a series of pbs special reports >> tonight, a special edition frontline. >> tragedy of unspeakable terms... >> multiple kids, 20 kids in fact... >> frontline and reporters from the hartford courant set out to investigate two important stories. first, haunting questions. who was adam lanza? >> adam had episodes where he would completely withdraw. >> and what clues are there in his relationship with his mother? >> he was never violent. she never feared him. >> nancy lanza is the person adam was closest to in the world. if we can begin to understand adam's relationship with nancy, we probably can begin to un>>rstand adam. d >> and inur second ory, a town dided over ns. >> when they pass a law that violates the constitution, i will not comply. >> and how the shootings have moved grieving newtown residents to join the debate. >> you have a tremendous power. and the fact that you're from newtown is even more important. >> we cannot be defined as a culture that accepts this. >> things must change. this is the time. >> these two stories in this special ed
a weeklong focus on guns here on pbs, "after newtown." on the newshour this evening, we look at political and other developments since the december tragedy and zero in on the gun debate in colorado. >> in the divisive atmosphere of the gun debate, both sides, at the federal and state level, say they know the coming months won't be easy. but they will be critical. >> ifill: then, we take up the arguments for and against the proposed construction of the keystone pipeline, as environmental activists mounted a protest this weekend. >> woodurff: ray suarez updates the hugo chavez story, after the president's surprise return to venezuela following more than two months of cancer treatment in cuba. >> ifill: and jeffrey brown talks with filmmaker kirby dick about his oscar-nominated documentary "the invisible war," detailing the high rate of sexual assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead
good evening. >> i'm judy woodruff of the pbs newshour. on the night of the state of the union address there is one subject almost everyone in the chamber is worrying about: the nation's continuing fiscal crisis. tonight frontline tells the inside story of how a clash of politics and personalities took the nation to the edge of the fiscal cliff. but those battles are not over-- more deadlines loom over steep mandatory cuts in federal spending, another debt ceiling vote, along with new worries over the effect of any cuts on a still-weak economy. at issue is nothing less than the size and responsibility of the federal government. we call the film "cliffhanger." frontline is made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening publ
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air travel, starting in april. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. moe 00th 1an air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights.
's movement and the pbs documentary, "makers: women who make america." >> we have realized that a majority of americans fully agree that women can do what men can do but we haven't yet realizednhamet can do what women do. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the federal government moved another day closer today to $85 billion in automatic spending cuts. and as political charges and counter-charges flew, federal reserve chief ben bernanke raised new fears about the potential economic fallout. the fed chairman told a senate committee that forcing across-the-board spending cut
, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contribution to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, sitting in for gwen ifill this week, john dickerson of "slate magazine" and cbs news john: good evening, this week, president obama gave the first state-of-the-union address of his second term. it was packed with almost 30 different policy proposals, some, like immigration reform, were familiar. others, like his call for expanding preschool and rating colleges, were new. it was a robust vision for a president engaged in hand-to-hand combat congressional republicans over the basic exchanges of government. still, the president said the country could afford all of it. >> nothing i'm proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. it is not a bigger government we need, but a smarter government that sets priorities and invests in broad-based growth. john: , so, karen, if bill clinton kind the famous phrase that the era of big government over, did president obama launch the era of smart government? >> that's going to depend on what side of
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: david o. russell was up for two oscars next month. it is often hard to quantify the role of director, but getting a good performance of the test is certainly at the top of the list. for the first time since 1981, all four principal actors in this movie are up for an oscar. quite an achievement. so much to get to tonight, but first, here are some scenes from "silver linings playbook." >> what is this i just hear about you getting out from loony bin? i thought you said you had it together, you were solid? >> i am solid. >> i just want us to be friends. >> i was having sex with everybody in the office. >> everybody? how many you were there? >> don't let tiffany get you in trouble. >> i can only do if i have a partner. >> is this the girl that you wrote about? >> you wrote about me? >> we are friends. >> out with aive reaches moment like this, it is a sin if you don't reach back. tavis: i am told you wrote this, but put it on the shelf and then obviously came back to it. that leads to the obvious question, what did "the
. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: the likelihood of dwight henry starring in a critically acclaimed film an award-winning movie could not have been more remote. the small-business owner and new orleans residents not only survived katrina, but they became one of the first businesses to reopen after the storm. the directors of "beast of the southern wild" asked him to star in their movie, and he said no, and now, dwight henry is one of the stars of the film. here are now some scenes of "beast of the southern wild." ♪ tavis: so the first question is, who is baking the good stuff? who is baking cookies when you are going out on tour, talking about your film? >> i have two partners who are holding it down while i go on this press tour. tavis: good to meet you. i just want to jump in because these stories are fascinating to me, how something comes together so organically, and it ends up being such a success that it winds at sundance, it gets all kind of a claim at cannes, it makes a star out of you, but it is your first time acting. >> yes. tavis: i am going to
hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: josh gad got a tony nomination, and he is now the star of the commonly "1600 penn," and here is a scene from "1600 penn." >> hi. what if i told you i found a way to combine one of my great passions with an employment opportunity? >> just make sure you thought it through. >> i am going off script now. you know i have got the skills. you have always said, "do what you love, and the money will follow." >> that is not the case with magic. >> what is that? i believe this is yours, sir. do you not want to ask how i did that? tavis: is the obama era at the right time -- i am not making judgment one way or another, but is this the right time for this type of sitcom? >> interestingly enough, the obama administration invited us to screen it. we got their blessing. ironically, the obama speech writer is our head writer, and so i think so. but the interesting thing about it, it is not necessarily a show about politics. it is a show about a family with the backup of politics. tavis: it is the white house.
on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet for bringing the national epidemic of obesity under control. at least, the latest numbers on calories and fast food, released today, indicated possible progress. for years, health officials have warned about americans' growing girth. now, research from the centers for disease control and prevention suggests the fight against fat may be having an effect. among the findings: american children consumed fewer calories in 2010 than a decade before-- 7% less for boys and 4% less for girls. and for adults, fast food accounted for just
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive lif >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: a u.s. security firm charged today there's an all-out effort to break into computer systems in the u.s. and elsewhere. the report laid out an extensive case against china and its military. the newest allegations of cyber attacks by the chinese government came up at the white house today. reporters asked spokesman jay carney about a study that blames china's military for a large-scale years-long hacking campaign. >> we have repeatedly raised our concerns at the highest levels about cyber attacks with senior chinese officials, including in the military, and we will continue to do so. >> woodruff: the report a
of special pbs coverage of gun violence draws to a close, we examine the ongoing debate in washington, in state houses in city halls. >> if a gun that was used 69 days ago to slaughter 20 children and six adults isn't an assault weapon, then they don't exist. >> a debate that is just beginning. covering the week, john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." david sanger of the "new york times." molly ball of the atlantic, and sari horwitz of "the washington post." >> award-winning coverage and adge sys, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- >> we know why we're here, to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people of boeing are working together to build a better tomorrow. >> that's why we're here. >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by prudential. additional funding is provided by
broadcasting, and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening, the u.s. government has been secretly targeting its enemies for years now, using unmanned aircraft to do the work. but this was the first week they said so out loud through a leaked white house white paper, that is, newly released legal memos and a high-profile confirmation for the next c.i.a. chief, a window was opened this week into how our wars are now waged, even when americans are the targets. >> we say that we only take these kinds of actions when there is an imminent threat, when capture is not feasible and when we are confident that we are doing so in a way that is consistent with federal and international law. gwen: the attorney general's words were carefully worded and john brennan, the likely new c.i.a. director was just as precise. >> the president has insisted that any actions we take will be legally grounded, will be thoroughly anchored in intelligence, will have the appropriate review process, approval process before
funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outside the u.s. embassy in ankara, turkey, today, killing himself and a security guard. the white house described it as a terrorist attack. the explosion occurred around 1:15 p.m. local time. afterward, police tried to hold back the crowd gathered outside the u.s. facility in the turkish capital. debris littered the street near a side entrance where the blast took place. emergency workers wheeled one of the injur
. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: millions of people in the northeast and new england battened down for a weekend blizzard today. forecasters warned it could be one for the record books. by this afternoon, the gathering storm was beginning to whiten the landscape for hundreds of miles, with long hours of snowfall still to come. fueling the fall, two low- pressure systems-- one from the midwest, the other from the southeast-- colliding over the northeast and new england. blizzard warnings were posted in seven states from new jersey on up to maine. at least three declared emergencies, an
. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: it was the starkest statement yet on the possible effect of automatic federal budget cuts, due to begin in nine days, on march first. defense secretary leon panetta notified his entire civilian work force that employees could be sent home without pay. the warning was aimed at defense department workers at the pentagon and around the world. secretary panetta sent them a written message, as he left for a nato defense ministers meeting in brussels. in it, he said there are limited options for coping with the looming across-the-board cuts. and, he said: >> on our civilians it will be catastrophic. >> woodruff: within hours, top pentagon officials were out, saying employees could lose one day of work per week for 22 weeks. civilians will experien
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our enomy for 160 f bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations.s and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama and congressional republicans traded barbs today, opening the final week before the looming sequester. but there was no outward sign of a breakthrough to prevent $85 billion in automatic spending reductions. >> these cuts do not have to happen. congress can turn them off any time with just a little bit of compromise. >> suarez: the president's appeal came as he met with the nation's governors at the white house amid growing indications that the sequester will indeed take effect. >> this town has to get past its obsession with focusing on the next
's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the world witnessed something today it had not seen since the 15th century: a sitting pope, benedict xvi, announced he is giving up the papacy. the news reverberated around the globe and stunned many of the world's 1.2 billion catholics. >> it was a big surprise because this doesn't happen all the time. and my first reaction was to pray and to call my friends, texted my friends and asked even my non-catholic and nonbelieving friends to keep us in their thoughts and in their prayers. >> i had never heard anything like this in my life. the pope has to be there unti
. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: another defiant act by north korea today. the nation carried out its third nuclear test, triggering new fears and a global outcry. the announcement blared forth on north korean state television. >> main purpose of this nuclear test is to show the resentment of our people and army of the united states' hostile actions that are no better than robbery. our nuclear test is a fair self-defensive action which ds not contravene any international law. >> brown: the underground blast took place at a remote location in the north eastern part of th
'm bob abernethy. you can follow us on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's always much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. ♪ >>> major funding is providing by the lily endowment, an minnesota-based private foundation. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designi designing cmiusto customized in and group products, and the corporation for public broadcasting.
follow us on twitter and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website, including more of kim lawton's interviews with tobymac and lecrae. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, tobymac. ♪ ♪in
together, we can stamp hunger out. pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: malik bendielloul, a documentary filmmaker behind one of the most talked-about documentaries, "searching for sugar man." it tells the remarkable story about rodriguez's remarkable comeback in south africa. the film is of for an oscar this year. here are some scenes. >> if ever there is an air of mystery around a pop artist, it is around the artist known as rodriguez. >> he was a wandering spirit around the city. ♪ >> it is a mystery, but it spread quickly. to many of us south africa as he was the soundtrack of our lives. it was the first who opposition to apartheid. he was a mystery. then we found out he committed suicide, and a lot of people have different versions of the story. i thought it would make a good story. there is nothing on the record to tell us who he was or where he was from, so we started to look at the lyrics. we found him. >> he was doing the work nobody else wanted to do he was a lot of things but not materialistic. >> the next day he says, i have got to go on tour, and we said, wh
hunger out. pbs station from viewers like thank you. tavis: jamie williams is a noted author. she is -- amy wilentz is a noted author. her latest revisits the nation of haiti. it is called "farewell, fred voodoo." we should start by talking about the title. >> friend voodoo is a name the international press corps used to name for the haitian on the street. what i would like to say is they are trained to go deeper than that and not just have a stereotypical view of haitians and what old colonists used to associate with their religion, but something real and in control of their own will, so farewell to the old image. let's look get the new -- look at the new haiti. tavis: what would you say is the typical american view? >> there is a lot of reality. impoverished. we associate in the u.s. poverty with backwardness, especially in a nation filled with akron people is american thing. and there is to do, -- is voodoo, and that image of them being associated with religion thought of assets -- as superstition and black magic. i have gone to a lot of voodoo ceremonies, and they are not what
and facebook and watch us anytime on the pbs app for iphones and ipads. there's much more on our website. you can comment on all of our stories and share them. audio and video podcasts are also available. join us at pbs.org. as we leave you, scenes of ash wednesday at the vatican, where pope benedict xvi celebrated what is expected to have been his last public mass as pope. ♪ ♪ ♪ . >> announcer: major funding is provided by the lily endowment, an indianapolis-based private family foundation dedicated o its founders' interest in religion, community development and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america, designing customized individual and grou retirement procts. that's why we're your retirement company. and the
on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the u.s. postal service announced today it plans to end saturday mail delivery beginning in aust.ah under the plan, post offices alreadopen on saturdays will remain so. packages will also continue to be delivered on saturdays. but home and business mail would end. the move would save an estimatee $2 billion annually. the postal service ended the last budget year with a record loss, nearly $16 billion. today's decision was criticized by several members of congress who may try to overule the agency. and the head of the letter carrier's union called the move "a disastrous idea that would have a profoundly negative effect." joining us now is postmaster general patrick donohoe. and welcome to you. you spoke today being in a "very scary position financially." how scary? >> well, here's where we are right flow. now. as you mentioned we had a pretty substan
: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the man picked to lead the central intelligence agency was called today to defend his positions in the war on terror. john brennan's senate confirmation hearing revolved around several hotly debated policies. "newshour" congressional correspondent kwame holman has our report. >> reporter: even before the hearing got truly under way, protesters from code pink disrupted john brennan's opening statement-- signaling that passions were running high on the targeted killings of terror suspects. >> they won't even tell congress w
on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> sailing through the heart of historic landscapes you see things differently. you get close to iconic landmarks, to local life, to cultural treasures. it's a feeling that only the river can give you. these are journeys that change your perspective on the world and perhaps even yourself. viking river cruises. exploring the world in comfort. >> bnsf railway. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a leaked document today put the spotlight back on lethal strikes by the u.s. government on u.s. citizens abroad. in response, top officials in the obama administration argued their actions are justified and legal. >> primary concern is to keep the american people safe, now
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement define
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